Diablo, diabolo ahm diablog – tell me what…

To spread some transatlantic confusion, we now present some nice sideways to the transatlantic diablog.

First of all. There are many more meanings of the words here on the east side of the Atlantic than on the other side. 20 years ago you asked your grandfather about those things. Now it’s Wikipedia. You don’t like it as much as your grandfather, but it’s a lot faster in terms of crossing the Atlantic. So…

What’s a “Diabolo”? It’s an old Greek word which means “Defamer” or describes someone who confuses. It also is a French drink made of water and sirup. So “diabolo menthe” must be a peppermint drink, right?

For us, the people who cross the Atlantic, it’s important to know that “diabolo” also is a boat class. A small one made of wood. A Japanese comic. The devil. Something to play with (known as “The devil on two sticks”).

And finally a small car of a German company. Photos here.

And what’s a “Diablo”? Well, for the original meaning of the word just check “Diabolo”.

In it’s phisical form it’s – again – a comic. This time from Germany. A band from Finland. Never hear of it, by the way. A French car. A fast car of an Italian company. Again this link for pictures.

And finally, it’s a town in California. Or in other words: “Diablo is a census-designated place (CDP) in Contra Costa County, California, United States.” [source]

Sounds interesting… The transatlantic diablog definitely has to take a trip to this place. Well, we’re working on that…

For the third word of the headline: You know the diablog, don’t you?

Update: Diablo is a mountain, too.

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