HOW TO GRAFT A PLANT: Cutting, inserting, binding and more – seven steps of grafting explained [Photo-report]

It is the process of bringing together two plants. Grafting. For the reason of making plants more efficient and resistant. An while it is harmless for the plants, it is also a step of cloning. Conducted for a long time – with roses, fruits and other trees.

According to Wikipedia, “grafting with detached scions has been practiced for thousands of years. It was in use by the Chinese before 2000 B.C., then spread to the rest of Eurasia and was well established in ancient Greece.”

All the master gardener needs to have is a stock or rootstock plant and another plant which sprout will be inserted. Here are the steps for grafting.

1. Cutting out the sprout, also called scion or cion, from the second plant.

2. Performing a “T-cut”, named after the shape of the cut, in the rootstock. Or cutting out a full piece of the rootstock.

Cutting out a chip of the rootstock.
Cutting out a chip of the rootstock.

3. Slightly loosing the bark of the rootstock. Only after performing a “T-cut.”

4. Inserting the scion into the gap underneath the bark. Or putting it onto the rootstock – the scion should not overlap.

The inserted scion.
The inserted scion.

5. Binding the wound with a special caoutchouc stripe or biodegradable plastics.

Binding the wound with biodegradable plastics.
Binding the wound with biodegradable plastics.

6. Waiting until the scion grows on. This may take a few weeks in which the caoutchouc disappears.

7. Cutting off the rootstock plant above the grafting spot.

The best time for grafting is from mid-July to mid-September. Also some months of winter until April.

More about that:
A history of grafting

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