THE STORY OF TIHANGE: A BELGIUM ATOMIC POWER PLANT FACING PROTESTS FROM GERMANY, THE NETHERLANDS AND BELGIUM

25 kilometres in the south-west of Belgium City Liège. Just a few minutes of driving from the borders to Germany and the Netherlands. Cities like Cologne and Aachen, the Ruhr area, as well as the Eifel National park just around the corner. Tihange. One of the two Belgium atomic power plants.

And one with history. In 2003 Belgium decided about stopping the use of atomic energy. The planned date for shutting down was October 1, 2015. But three and a half years earlier the Belgium feared a shortage of electricity after the end of Tihange and expanded the period to 2025.

According to reports various incident happened at Tihange in the last 15 years. Incident inside the power plant, as well as the finding of an old German World War II bomb close to the reactor. In 2015 flaws were discovered in the building. To this date the power plant is still working – with growing fears and concerns.

In the meantime an alliance of towns and councils around Tihange has been formed to officially protest against Tihange. Such as the German, Belgium and Dutch alliance stop-tihange.de.

Here is a video-report by Breaking Maas, a student TV channel, reporting about protests against Tihange in the Dutch city of Maastricht.

The British Guardian reports about communities and campaigners in Germany, the Netherlands and Luxembourg who lobby for the closure of two ageing 40-year old Belgian nuclear reactors close to borders.

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